Avoid these mistakes and you're guaranteed to have truly amazing wedding music

Whether you consider yourselves music people or not, the music at your wedding is super important, and a great band and/or DJ can be the difference between an okay wedding and an unforgettable one. 

1. Dismissing the idea of a band or DJ before doing some research.

This is your first music decision to make and it'll narrow down your options by half. Love live music and have a bigger budget? A band might be your preferred pick. Have a tighter budget or dozens of songs you'd like played perfectly (in other words, exactly how they sound on Spotify)? A DJ could be your perfect choice. But don't dismiss either because you think a band will automatically be out of your budget or a DJ will be cheesy.

Music Must: Find a professional like Send me an Angel to assist you with your planning!


2. Starting the ceremony in silence.

Most guests will arrive 20 to 30 minutes before the ceremony starts, but the wait will seem a lot longer if they have to wait around in silence. Book your ceremony musician to start no later than 20 minutes before you begin.

Music Must: Having music before and during the ceremony will also help signal to guests that it's time to be seated or get quiet by upping the volume or tempo.


3. Offending your officiant with your ceremony music.

Getting married in a house of worship? When it comes to ceremony music, many churches, synagogues and other religious institutions have rules that could affect your choice of ceremony music, like prohibiting certain secular songs. It may be your wedding day, but unfortunately it's not technically your church, so respect the regulations.

Music Must: It's a good idea to speak to your officiant before you book musicians to play a classical version of The Beatles's "All You Need Is Love" composed for your ceremony and can't get your deposit back.


4. Skipping a sound check.

Depending on your venue, there may be limitations (like power supply, sound amplification or time-of-day restrictions) to the type of music you can have. Even without regulations, it's still a good idea to ask your venue manager what type of music typically works best for the space (for example, a soloist may feel tiny in a grand ballroom, but may work well for an intimate garden party). Music Must: Plan for your band or DJ to do a walk-through if they haven't worked in the space before. While you might not realize that crashing waves could easily drown out a string quartet or trio of flutes, a pro can help spot and solve any tricky music situations with a sound check.


5. Waiting until the wedding to meet your musicians in person.

Want to know exactly what your music might sound like in real life (rather than a recorded sample)? Take in a live performance. Checking this task off your list can actually be a lot of fun. Go to a showcase if that's an option. Grab your fiancé, put on your best going-out outfit and make it a date night. While you're there, pay attention to the tunes and also how the band or DJ emcees, whether they take requests, and how well they get the audience going. If you can, talk to the DJ or bandleader at some point one-on-one or set up another time to meet face-to-face. This person will be your emcee, so you want to have an easy rapport.

Music Must: Make a note of the names of the particular musicians or DJs you like, so you'll be sure to book the same exact people for your party.


6. Forgetting to talk through the must-play songs.

Don't assume your band or DJ is going to play every one of your favorites. If it's a band, talk to them about this list before you decide to book—they may have to learn a song or two. For DJs, just be certain they're open to your suggestions.

Music Must: If they're missing a few of your favorites from their repertoire, ask whether there are any fees associated with adding them.


7. Making it impossible for guests to hear each other.

Your reception isn't the place for nightclub-level volume. It'll only frustrate your older family members and make it tough for them to talk to one another and enjoy the party. And you don't want your guests to wake up with sore throats from having to yell to each other all night.

Music Must: When going over your timeline with your DJ, you can make volume requests. Ask for low volume during cocktail hour and dinner (like instrumentals and soft ballads) and louder for dancing and the final song (yes, you can go all out for "Sweet Caroline"). On the wedding day, ask a bridesmaid or your day-of consultant to keep volume on their radar and alert the band or DJ if there are any issues.


8. Choosing a really long first-dance song.

You may do anything for love, but if you choose Meatloaf's "I'd Do Anything for Love" as your first-dance song, you'll be swaying with your new spouse for more than five minutes (12 if you choose the album version!). Do a run-through and you may realize four minutes can feel like forever if you're just rocking back and forth. Yes, it's about you two, but keep your guests in mind too. 

Music Must: A little choreography goes a long way, so you might decide to take a few lessons. Or if your heart is set on a certain ballad, work with your DJ to cut your song down to a reasonable length, or talk with your band about performing a shorter version.


9. Leaving out a do-not-play list.

Sit down with your soon-to-be-spouse and go through your favorite songs together to create the must-play and do-not-play lists. If you decide to use a band instead of a DJ, give them plenty of time to review your picks, in case they have to add a song to their repertoire. Once you've handed over the lists, leave the rest up to the pros